The Influence of a Prisoner

New Testament: Acts 27.26–32

To read the Bible in a year, read Acts 27.26–44 on July 28, In the year of our Lord Christ 2021

By Don Ruhl 

Paul told the people of the ship that was carrying him to Rome, that an angel revealed during the storm they were in, they would run aground on an island. Luke wrote of the danger during the horrible storm. The situation grew so bad that the sailors decided to abandon ship secretly and take the ship’s only skiff. Watch what happened next: 

Paul said, “However, we must run aground on a certain island.” Now when the fourteenth night had come, as we were driven up and down in the Adriatic Sea, about midnight the sailors sensed that they were drawing near some land. And they took soundings and found it to be twenty fathoms; and when they had gone a little farther, they took soundings again and found it to be fifteen fathoms. Then, fearing lest we should run aground on the rocks, they dropped four anchors from the stern, and prayed for day to come. And as the sailors were seeking to escape from the ship, when they had let down the skiff into the sea, under pretense of putting out anchors from the prow, Paul said to the centurion and the soldiers, “Unless these men stay in the ship, you cannot be saved.” Then the soldiers cut away the ropes of the skiff and let it fall off.”

– Acts 27.26–32 

A Roman centurion listened to the advice of his prisoner! 

Think about that the rest of the day.

Questions: 

  • Why did the centurion listen to his prisoner? 
  • When you have figured that out, ask yourself: Would the man guarding me listen to my advice? If not, why not?

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